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Your Sparkling Wine Glass Guide for a Party​

SommWine's

Sparkling Wine Glass Guide for a Party

Vacinations are complete; lockdown is over and you’re hosting a party! But which wine glasses should you use?

Here is SommWine’s Sparkling Wine Glass Guide. We’ll tell you why some choose the flute, the vintage flute, a regular
white wine glass or the old-fashioned coupe for sparkling wine.

Why are we talking about sparkling wine glasses? Because we need something to celebrate in 2021.

 

 

SommWine's

Guide to Sparkling Wine Glasses

The flute

Photo of a flute glass for sparkling wine

 

The flute is a narrow glass designed to keep your bubbles active for the longest. This is the most popular choice for serving sparkling wine for good reason…

Pros: A flute’s form is tall, lean and simple. It maintains the bubbles in your wine the longest due to its slender shape. This is a recognizable, functional and elegant crystal glass.

Cons: This style is not great for wine aromatics. The glass provides only a small wine surface and therefore little exposure to oxygen for releasing wine aromas.

 

The vintage flute

Photo of a vintage sparkling wine flute

 

Vintage flutes are a crystal glasses that are quite tapered at the top and have a wider bulge in the middle. They are fashioned exclusively for vintage-dated sparkling wines and Champagne.

Vintage sparkling wines are wines made in the ‘traditional method’ and usually aged on their lees for long periods of time (such as Gran Reserva Cavas, the Cava de Paraje Calificados and Vintage Champagnes). They are generally aged much longer in the cellar before release than their Non-Vintage (NV) counterparts. The vintage (year) will be listed on the front label of the wine.

Because they are aged, they show developed aromas and flavours that reflect the time spent on their lees (dead yeasts) – lemon peel oxidative aromas, créme brûlée, lemon custard, and toast characteristics – These wines are really meant to be sniffed, drunk slowly and reflected on.

Pros: This glass makes you look cool. It’s slim enough to maintain the bubbles in your wine and the slightly wider girth will allow you to smell some of the developed aromatics of an aged wine.

Cons: None

 

SommWine's Tip:

If you don't have any narrow flute sparkling glasses, don't tell your guests. Serve your sparkling wines in a white wine glass. Let them know this is what all of the sommeliers are doing!

The white wine glass

Photo of a white wine glass that tapers at the top

It’s now de riguer to serve sparkling wine in a white wine glass. Make sure the glass slightly tapers at the top.

Pros: A wider glass exposes a larger wine surface to oxygen for optimal aromatics while the tapered top funnels the aromas towards your nose when you take a sip. Wine savvy people will adore you for this.

Cons: The bubbles won’t last as long in this glass so pour only a little at a time. Most people will think you just don’t have any ‘proper’ slim Champagne glasses, so make sure you let them know why you are serving their bubbles this way – to experience the aromas best!

 

[If you want to understand a French wine label, you should read our series on the History of French Wine Law that starts here.

The coupe

Photo of an old fashioned coupe glass
 
These are the Champagne glasses my mother has in the China cabinet. This style is generally associated with the baby-boomer era. Legend has it that the coupe was designed from a mold of Marie Antoinette’s breast!
 
Pros: None. These are now being used for classic cocktails where they belong. Only bring these out at parties if you want to laugh at people spilling their wine (not recommended)
 

Cons: The bubbles won’t last as long. Because you can’t walk or move without spilling the contents, these glasses are only good for sitting at a bar. Despite the wide surface area exposure, they are not great for enjoying the aromatics of the wine.

Sparkling wine aromatics are delicate, they will escape your nose with this ultra wide top. Better glasses will guide the aromas in a funnel towards your nose.

 

SommWine's Tip:

Make sure your glasses are rinsed with hot water and free from dishwasher soap residue. The soap residue can prevent bubbles from forming, prevent them from floating to the top and leave you without that wonderful visual.

So sit back, pop a cork and zoom with some friends! Here’s to a better 2021!

Thanks for reading SommWine’s sparkling wine guide. If you are interested in our upcoming online wine courses click here.

[This is an updated and enhanced post from December 30, 2019.]

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